World Toilet Day on November 19th

05.11.2018

Special for World Toilet Day on November 19, the Museum of the Toilette History opens its doors for a free viewing of the exhibits of the Museum.

For your attention - new exhibits of XIX century - a pan water-closet with a ceramic bowl The Pan Water-Closet, 70s of the XIX century and a glass-bowl of 1879 - "National" / on the inside of the "National" exhibit are two inscriptions "Twyford's National Patent" and the registration number.

The museum's owners purchased exhibits from the private English collector Simon Kirby in Stratford-upon-Avon (United Kingdom). Simon Kirby has more than 200 unique copies of Thomas Crapper & Co. He was impressed with the fact that the Ukrainian Museum of the Toilette History studies the history of the development of toilet culture from ancient times to the present and offered to buy an extremely rare offered to buy an extremely rare exhibit - a toilet bowl of the XIX century.

A bit of history. The first drain clot in Europe appeared in the XVI century, but it was not appreciated. It took almost 200 years to know its necessity. Therefore, it is considered to be the birth date of the sixteenth century water-closet. And already in the XIX century, the "drainage toilet" confidently traveled to Europe and North America.

At this time there are several types of water-closets, but not at the same time - gradually as a result of technological progress.

The first inventors were the mechanics who used metal for the bowl of the toilet, and the frame was made of wood. Subsequently, the Metal cup was replaced with ceramic, so the potters were involved in this process. They were gradually replaced by all metal elements that quickly rusted, replaced by ceramic. And the mechanics were concentrating on the drain tank.

The first drainage toilets were valves (The valve closet). The valve is a unique invention of plumbers and a huge problem for users. He rusted, broke, missed water and smelled. The mechanics did not lose hope for its improvement. In 1796, the London livestock, William Law (William Law), received a patent for an advanced water-closet with a drip valve.